MPA Logo, San Francisco Maritime National Park Association, USS Pampanito, Historic Ships at Hyde Street Pier, Education Programs Maritime Park Association Home Page Maritime Park Association Home Page Events Maritime Park Association Home Page Maritime Park Association Home Page Maritime Park Association Home Page Volunteer Membership Donate Maritime Park Association Home Page USS Pampanito Submarine Historic Ships at Hyde Street Pier Education Programs About Maritime Park Association Home Page Directions to Maritime Jobs at Maritime Facility Rental at Maritime Trustees of the Association Calendar Press Room Store Maritime Map

The Age of Sail

All hands on DeckThe year is 1906, and the students, or "lads," are immersed in an eighteen hour journey through the past. As "green" hands on their overnight stint aboard a historic vessel, they must learn to step lively and gain the necessary skills to set sail on the evening tide.

Under the watchful eyes of the ship's officers, crews receive their orders and are expected to carry them out independently. The lads must listen carefully and utilize their resources to solve problems such as throwing a heaving line, rigging a bosun's chair or cooking for the entire crew on a wood burning stove.

The program encourages students to develop self-confidence and self-reliance, which in turn fosters a sense of responsibility for themselves, their shipmates, and their community.

Grades: 4-8
Length: Approx 18 hours
Time: 2:00 pm to 8:30 am
Group Size: 27 to 40 students and 6 to 8 adults (Paid minimum is 27 students and 6 adults after which 1 teacher is free; groups over 35 students add a $250 fee for an add’l instructor)
Cost: $68.00 per student / $38.00 per adult
We charge for 6 adults as the minimum cost and the teacher comes for free.

Information for teachers
Information for parents

Download our informational flyer

 

Photo Tour of Paul Revere Elementary's Age of Sail

Photo of bosun chair in use in the twilight.

"I loved this trip because it really helped me be a good sport in life." (Kelly)

"I am happy I am here because I am doing things that I have never done before." (Joyce)

On October 18th and 19th a fourth grade class from Paul Revere Elementary in San Francisco had a voyage of a life time. They would like to share some of their memories with you.

"Last year I became a "Tall Sailor" for my 4th grade daughter's class on an overnight "ropes" course field trip on the C. A. Thayer sailing Ship at the Maritime Museum at Hyde Street Pier. I got a chance to experience children going from being dependent upon the adults around them to becoming independent problem solvers. It's often difficult to find educational programs that can teach lifelong lessons the way this experience did.

I had visions of my students holding weekend garage sales and car washes and peddling their wares on Cortland Avenue, begging the neighbors to buy a candy bar to raise funds for this trip. Fortunately for the class, a guardian angel showed up. None of us will ever forget this experience. Now let's let the children speak." (Lisa, teacher)

"After we ate our lunches in the grassy area at Hyde Street Pier, we went to the Maritime Museum. It was cool. After that, we walked to our ship called the Balclutha. Later we got in "all hands" and met the captain. Everyone took their hats off. The captain only wanted 10 sailors, but instead he got 30 greenhands." (Justin)

"We had to work on the ship because we were pretending that it was 1906 and it was right after the big earthquake and fire! We were recruited by Mr. Ramos as greenhands. Greenhands are new, inexperienced sailors. Our goal was to learn the jobs on a ship and work as a team to get the ship ready for sailing to Oregon to bring back lumber to rebuild San Francisco." (Carlos)

"Every time I worked on Balclutha, I helped my crew and tried my best at all times. Sometimes I couldn't tie the lines but my whole group helped me and I felt good." (Sylvia)

I really learned a lot on the ship, but I mostly learned how to work together even if you don't like somebody. The thing that we had to do most was work together because if we didn't we wouldn't have got through it all." (Kelly)

"It was important for me because everybody worked together. It was hard for me to stay quiet, but on the ship they couldn't rely on me or ask me any questions about their problems. The kids had to carry their own gear and be responsible for their own mistakes throughout the trip. I noticed that they came together and worked out their problems without the adults getting involved. To see them work together, that made me think that all students could work together and solve any problems that they have in the future." (Anthony, student teacher)

"29 children turned into sailors that night. What a true metamorphosis. Some struggled. Some did not. Some laughed. Some used their nerves a lot. Some grew stronger. Some grew wiser. Most got smarter and stronger. I feel pride, pride in my class, pride in San Francisco, pride in the maritime folks who know the value of this type of character building education. Thank you from the depths of my heart and brain for the experience that will be a metaphor for our whole lifetime." (Lisa, teacher)

The Age of Sail

Experiential Education at Hyde St. Pier

The Longboat Crew

Photo of crew hauling lines.

"The best part of the trip was when we hauled up the dory. We hauled it up straight and not crooked and we got an 8 for our score from the captain.
 

Photo of crew in rowing boat.

Teamwork is when you help each other. Our crew worked well together because Mr. Wright helped us learn how to work together by hauling and heaving lines to bring up the dory. I would recommend this trip to other students because you get to stay on a real ship overnight.... You also get to eat good food that your friends made for you." (Earl)
 

The Bosun Crew

Photo of crew trowing a heaving line. "The bosun crew's jobs were to throw lines, make knots, and push people up in the bosun's chair. It was hard work, but it was a good experience." (Carlos)
 

Crew working the capstan. All crews worked together on the capstan to haul up the gear. "It was hard work but we had fun." (Arthur)
 

The Galley Crew

Working in the galley "For dinner we prepared stew. I liked the way it was cooked. I was able to eat a lot!" (Ashley) "We made oatmeal, coffee cake, and hot chocolate for breakfast. The galley teacher's name was Peanut. Peanut did not know how to do math nor did she know how to cook so she put Daniel in charge!" (Camille)
 

The Deckhand Crew

Crew hauling mooring lines. "The deckhand crew was a hard crew. We had to carry the ropes on to the ship. It was hard to carry them. The next thing we did was to ring the bells." (Liliane)
 

The Rigger Crew

Hauling a teacher up in a bosun's chair.

"I was part of the rigger crew. I was the mate. I had to give orders to my crew. My crew made a bosun's chair and I was the first one to get in it." (Darlene)

"I learned how to tie rope in a block so it can take it into the sky." (Melissa)

"I was not scared to go in the bosun's chair. It was very fun and high." (Nina)
 

Crew walking up the gangway with cleaning tools.

"I learned discipline and swabbing the deck and tying knots. I am here because it is worth it. I am happy for being taught to be a sailor." (Marico)

"29 children turned into sailors that night. What a true metamorphosis. Some struggled. Some did not. Some laughed. Some used their nerves a lot. Some grew stronger. Some grew wiser. Most got smarter and stronger. I feel pride, pride in my class, pride in San Francisco, pride in the maritime folks who know the value of this type of character building education. Thank you from the depths of my heart and brain for the experience that will be a metaphor for our whole lifetime." (Lisa, teacher)

Quotes taken from "Anchors aweigh!" By Lisa Bishop's 4th grade class, Paul Revere Elementary, New Bernal Journal. Dec. 1998/Jan. 1999 and from the logbook kept on the night of the voyage.

Photographs taken by Tim Campbell and Steve Danford, San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park.

For more information, or to make reservations, please contact Education Coordinator, Alice Watts via email, or call (415) 561-6662 x 33

 

Copyright © 2006-2014, Maritime Park Association
All Rights Reserved
Legal Notices and Privacy Policy
Version 2.02, 10 July, 2014